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THE GHOST OF BAYBORO CAMPUS
Reported by Brandy Buchanan. 8/23/00
"Sometimes, it [the elevator] would sit there and not move.  It was an old cranky elevator."

Letta Ramsay, of Student Services, presently works in the office located right beside the elevator in question.   Since the Bay building's restructuring the elevator has been reconditioned, but not replaced.  So far, though, she also has noted nothing unusual. 

"I never heard anything about a ghost or the elevator before you asked," she said. (Continued below)


          The Ghost of Nelson Poynter

          It is said that the ghost of Nelson Poynter still travels on the elevator located in the Bayboro Building.  The sight of abnormal activity for both the living and the dead, this elevator has been prone to strange behavior that some have blamed on the ghost.  The Bayboro Building now houses a variety of important campus services including the Registrar's Office, Student Services, Financial Aid, and the campus cashier on the first floor.  The second floor has the computer center, classrooms, and the Dean's suite, among other offices for staff and faculty.  However, at one point in time, not so long ago, it was the home of the Bayboro campus library named in honor of this man who loved to spend time among its books.   While the building was still a library the elevator within was already known for its unusual behavior.

          "Well, I never saw it.  I heard them say that one of the night crew saw the ghost and there was talk about it, but I never knew if it was a joke or not," said Jan Boyd, a library staff member.   Jan worked in the "old building" her first year at the library and was one of the staff who helped move the library into its new home.


Well, perhaps the newness of the campus Bay building is not what the spirit is interested in.  Maybe his ghost departed when the library was transferred to a newer building and the old Bay building was gutted for office space. Perhaps he was never there in the first place, but was merely a creative way to explain a quirky old elevator.  Or maybe, just maybe, he moved into the new building to remain a guardian over the faculty, staff, and books that it houses.  But, the next time you find yourself alone in the library, or if the Bay building elevator acts up while you in it, say hello to Mr. Poynter.  I'm sure he'd be glad for a little conversation.
This article has been printed with the permission of all parties involved.

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As an addendum, I went to the Bay Building on the USF campus and took photos of the elevator using a digital camera in order to augment the look of the article in Bayside News and see if I could get anything.  I took a series of photos with the flash, and a series of photos without the flash.  The photos with flash appear very clear and crisp, but the photos without the flash have an unusual whitish area that appear in them. I  took into account that the lense may have been dirty, but the whitish image does move a bit.  I took Photo 1, the first photo at the begining of this article, with the flash, then turned off the flash and took photos from the same location.  Since this was my first time using  a digital camera I was not sure what the proper look would be.  I did quickly scan the photos after I took them but did not see any of the white images at that point.

One photo, Photo Five, "Light Source", does show the light source in the hallway.  Note, though, that it is not a florescent light, as I would expect to produce the whitish image were it mere light refraction.  In the background is student services, and though they had some lights on I did not think them strong enough to produce such an image.


<-----I was standing about here to take the photos.  The hall is long and narrow, making it awkward to take pictures.  Of course, I don't often take photos of an elevator.  At least not voluntarily!
<--- Note light source
Photo 1:  Photo of elevator with flash activated on digital camera.
Photo 2:  Note image.
Photo 3:  Note image.  Has it moved?
Photo 4:  Images.